The Washington, D.C., Experience

Living with and learning from fellow interns has always been an important part of the Internship program. The intensive experience fosters life-long bonds and connections to an extensive network of alumni. One of the key benefits of the internship is the opportunity to build a network of friends and professional contacts. Many interns have been offered permanent positions in Washington as a result of the experience gained and the contacts made during the internship program.

The Foundation provides housing and per diem ($42 a day) for food and incidentals. Housing is in apartment-style university residence halls. Although some singles may be available, most interns will be paired with a same-sex roommate. Rooms are furnished and equipped with high-speed internet (bedding, linen, dishes and utensils not included).

Special enrichment activities are a distinguishing feature of the Internship Program; our interns have met with elected officials, Cabinet-level executives, and Supreme Court justices. In recent years, we have scheduled meetings with prominent Washington officials and tribal advocacy groups, such as Rep. Dale Kildee, co-chair of the House Native American Caucus; Jacqueline Pata, Executive Director of National Congress of American Indians; and Robert McSwain, Director, Indian Health Service; Lynn Scarlet, U.S. Department of Interior. In addition, we arrange a one-day, executive education (Nation Building) session with Native Nations Institute and meetings with Native congressional staffers and professionals.

Photo of Rep. Dale Kildee (D-MI) with 2006 interns.

The 2006 Interns meet with Rep. Dale Kildee (D-MI), Co-Chair of the House Native American Caucus

Photo of Rep. Mark Udall (D-CO), 2007 Intern Katie Hoyt, Deputy Secretary of the Interior Lynn Scarlett, and Rep. Tom Udall (D-NM)

Rep. Mark Udall (D-CO), 2007 Intern Katie Hoyt, Deputy Secretary of the Interior Lynn Scarlett, and Rep. Tom Udall (D-NM)